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our history

Target® through the years

Browse our interactive timeline to learn how we’ve become the preferred shopping destination for our guests. From our department store roots in the early 1900s to the opening of the first Target store in 1962 and on into the present in Canada, you’ll learn about all of our key company milestones.

1900

1902

our founder George Draper Dayton

In 1881, native New Yorker George D. Dayton decides to explore the growing Midwest markets. After several years in banking and real estate, Dayton decides Minneapolis offers the strongest opportunities for growth. He purchases land on Nicollet Avenue and forms the Dayton Dry Goods Company–today, known as Target Corporation.

Dayton's personal principles shapes the new store, including his belief in the "the higher ground of stewardship." His store soon becomes known for dependable merchandise, fair business practices and a generous spirit of giving. As President, he remains active in the store's management until his death in 1938. His son and grandsons take over leadership and begin to grow the Dayton Company into a nationwide retailer.

1902

An old-fashioned newspaper ad reads, in part, The Daylight Store. Dayton’s, formerly Goodfellow’s, The Store That Can Say, “We Satisfy” creation of Dayton Dry Goods Company

George D. Dayton, a banker and real estate investor, becomes a partner in Goodfellow's Dry Goods Company, the fourth largest department store in Minneapolis, Minn. The following year, desiring greater involvement, Dayton takes sole ownership of the store and becomes the first President of the newly named Dayton Dry Goods Company.

1910

1911

Dayton's Department Store

After a decade of rapid growth, Dayton Dry Goods Company is renamed The Dayton Company to better reflect its wide assortment of goods and services. It becomes commonly known as Dayton's department store.

1916

associated merchandising corporation

The Dayton Company becomes a founding member of the Retail Research Association, a cooperative of leading retailers. In 1918, the association expands and is renamed the Associated Merchandising Corporation.

1918

a history of giving

George D. Dayton creates The Dayton Foundation with a $1 million endowment and a purpose to aid in promoting the welfare of mankind anywhere in the world. Renamed the Dayton-Hudson Foundation in 1969, it later becomes the Target Foundation in 2000.

"Success is making ourselves useful in the world, valuable to society, helping in lifting in the level of humanity, so conducting ourselves that when we go the world will be somewhat better of our having lived the brief span of our lives."

—George Draper Dayton

1920

1920

Merchandise Takes Flight

Merchandise shipments come to a standstill during a freight-handlers strike, preventing the shipment of goods from New York to Minneapolis. Facing the prospect of empty shelves and dissatisfied shoppers, Dayton's captures the imagination of America by using airplanes to transport goods across country. Two Curtiss Northwest Airplane Company planes pick up 400 pounds of merchandise and make the flight to Minnesota — the longest commercial flight ever at the time. The arriving planes are paraded through the streets of Minneapolis and throngs of onlookers immediately purchase the in-demand goods. This innovative solution helps pave the way to a new method of transporting merchandise across the United States.

1922

Introducing WBAH Radio

Dayton Company creates WBAH Radio, one of only six radio stations in Minneapolis and the first radio broadcast station to be operated by a department store in the Twin Cities. At the time, it is the most powerful in the entire Midwest. In less than two months, the station sets an official distance record when the local broadcasting is heard in England.

1930

1938

Passing the Torch

Following George D. Dayton's death, son George N. Dayton is named President of The Dayton Company.

1940

1946

An advertisement reads “Thanks to Your Community Chest, Your One Contribution Works at 1,580 Places. Wear it Proudly” Giving 5 Percent to Communities

The Dayton Company establishes the practice of giving 5 percent of pretax profits back to the community. In doing so, it becomes the second American company to establish a preset amount of annual giving.

1950

1950

A New Generation of Leadership

Following the death of his father, George N. Dayton, Donald C. Dayton, grandson of the company founder, becomes president of The Dayton Company, thus ushering in a new generation of leadership. Eventually, all of the founder's grandsons—Wallace, George II, Kenneth, Donald, Bruce and Douglas—take leadership positions within the company.

1953

Commercial Interiors

Dayton's opens a commercial interiors department specifically tailored to offer furnishings, fabrics and decorations for business and other public institutions. Now known as Target Commercial Interiors, this highly-regarded commercial service provides productive working environments to small, medium and large organizations across the country.

1954

Dayton's First Branch Location

The company's first expansion outside downtown Minneapolis takes place in March, when a full-line Dayton's is established in Rochester, Minn.

1956

Expansion to the Suburbs

To meet the needs of busy suburban families, The Dayton Company expands to the suburbs of Minneapolis with the opening of Southdale Mall, the nation's first fully enclosed shopping center. Southdale changes the face of retail in the United States when Dayton's takes the then unheard-of step of placing top competitors together under the same roof. Stores thrive as busy shoppers flock to the mall, and Dayton's follows suit with three more shopping centers over the next 20 years: Brookdale in 1962; Rosedale in 1969; and Ridgedale in 1974; all located within the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area.

1960

1960

Spring Arrives Early at Dayton's

In March, Dayton's unveils its first Flower Show, inspired by gardens from around the world. Eight different gardens, ranging from Hawaii to Holland, were on display for all shoppers to enjoy. The free annual event offered winter-weary shoppers a preview of spring's vibrant colors and fragrances.

1960

A poster with the bullseye logo background features a headline that reads “Target is a new idea in discount stores” Entrance into Discount Retailing

As The Dayton Company looks for new ways to strengthen relationships with guests, company leadership recognizes an opportunity to develop and introduce a new kind of mass-market discount store that caters to value-oriented shoppers seeking a higher-quality experience. At the time, the move toward mass-market retail is considered risky by some industry experts as it moves away from the company's dominant position as a department store retailer. By demonstrating visionary leadership, the company takes the first step toward transforming the organization from a family-run department-store chain into one of the nation's largest discount-store chains.

1961

Making it Official

On May 9, 1961, the Minneapolis Tribune reports that The Dayton Company plans to form a new discount chain store. The store's new president, Douglas J. Dayton, draws upon the company's vast wealth of department store experience and states that the new store will, "combine the best of the fashion world with the best of the discount world, a quality store with quality merchandise at discount prices, and a discount supermarket...75 departments in all." Shopping at the new, currently unnamed store will be fun, delightful and welcoming to the entire family. The stores will include wide aisles, easy-to-shop displays, fast checkout and, "loads of well-lighted parking…for 1,200 cars."

1962

Creation of an Icon

In the months before the first Target store opens its doors, former Dayton's Director of Publicity Stewart K. Widdess, is tasked to name and define the new retail store. Widdess and his staff debate more than 200 possible names. In a burst of red-and-white inspiration, they come up with "Target" and immediately envision a classic Bullseye logo. The reasoning behind the choice was, "As a marksman's goal is to hit the center bulls-eye, the new store would do much the same in terms of retail goods, services, commitment to the community, price, value and overall experience."

1962

A poster for the Grand Opening of a Target Discount Store and Supermarket features a drawing of a large shopping complex. Text reads, in part, “Today, May 3, Snelling Avenue at Highway 36” The Birth of Target

On May 1, 1962, guests in the Twin Cities area wake to the news of Target's first grand opening in Roseville, Minn. Heralded as a, "new idea in discount stores," Target differentiates itself from other retail stores by combining many of the best department store features — fashion, quality and service — with the low prices of a discounter. Created as, "a store you can be proud to shop in, a store you can have confidence in, a store that is fun to shop and exciting to visit," by the end of 1962, Target opens additional locations in St. Louis Park, Crystal and Duluth, Minn.

1963

Holidays at Dayton's

In 1963, Dayton's brings the magic of the holidays and beloved children's stories to life through a new holiday auditorium show. The free event becomes an annual tradition as guests stroll through animated vignettes and visit Santa's workshop. Over the next four decades, memorable tales such as A Christmas Carol, Cinderella and Harry Potter are brought to life for entire families to enjoy.

1963

The Joys of Summer

Dayton's celebrates summer by transforming the entire store into a kaleidoscope of color and activity. Corner window displays are converted into a working, old-fashioned ice cream parlor and an outdoor BBQ. Inside, guests can relax on convenient park benches next to a bubbling fountain or be entertained by an eight-piece band, flower and balloon vendors, fashion shows and more.

1966

Target opens its first stores outside of Minnesota in the Denver metro area.

1967

A stock certificate reads, in part, “450,000 Shares, Dayton Corporation Common Stock” Growth on a National Scale

After a decade of significant growth, Dayton's transforms itself from a regional department-store company to a national retailer. The company's Initial Public Offering (IPO) is Oct. 18, 1967. President Donald C. Dayton takes the new position of chairman of the board, and Bruce B. Dayton steps into the president role. The corporation has five autonomous divisions: Dayton's department stores, Target Stores, B. Dalton Bookseller, Dayton Jewelers and Dayton Development Company. The corporate expansion opens new doors and becomes the first step in bringing Dayton's foundation of affordable, quality fashion, innovative management, community giving and good corporate governance to a national audience.

1968

A poster features the profile of a woman with bouffant sixties-style curls wearing a long drop earring that ends with a large Target bullseye logo. The headline reads “Flair for Fashion” Updating the Bullseye

In the late 1960s, Target expands across the country to the metro areas of St. Louis, Dallas and Houston. The Bullseye logo design is revamped into a more direct, memorable and poignant symbol of the company — what it stands for and offers to all guests everywhere.

1969

First Distribution Center

In Fridley, Minn., the corporation opens its first distribution center—a warehouse responsible for storing and shipping trailer loads of products to Target stores.

1969

A New Partnership

Dayton Corporation joins forces with the J.L. Hudson Company of Detroit to create the Dayton-Hudson Corporation. The two companies have similar merchandising philosophies and decades of commitment to outstanding corporate governance. The celebration of this new partnership includes a three-day long flower show on Wall Street. The merger establishes the corporation as one of the 15 largest non-food retailers in the nation.

1970

1970

Earth Day Volunteers

In the 1970s, Dayton-Hudson Corporation observes Earth Day by giving out pine trees to guests and supporting store team members who volunteer to plant trees and clean parks in Minnesota, Missouri, Texas, Colorado and Oklahoma.

1973

Lending a Helping Hand

Holiday Helpers, a program first conceived of by Jim Simms, store manager in Moline, Ill., offers a great holiday-shopping event for our senior and disabled guests by providing personal shopping assistance in a friendly, festive shopping environment. In 1974, the popular event goes chain-wide and becomes an annual event.

1974

Shopping Made Easy

As Target grows, so does our commitment to providing guests with a consistent shopping experience at every store, no matter the location. In 1974, we introduce our first planograms, which help team members deliver clean, uncluttered and in-stock merchandise presentations. Today, planograms are an integral part of our guests' shopping experience.

1975

Target Stores becomes the No. 1 revenue producer of the Dayton-Hudson Corporation.

1975

Now in Your Sunday Paper

Target introduces its weekly newspaper advertisement.

1977

Family Management Transition

In the 1950s, the Dayton family paves the way for new leadership. Seeing the need for superior managerial talent to succeed in a competitive retail environment, they adopt philosophies that encourage advancement and establish organizational success as a top priority. Donald, Wallace and Douglas Dayton cede their management responsibilities and retire by 1978.

1978

Dayton-Hudson Corporation purchases Mervyn's of California.

1979

An Organizational Milestone

Target Stores celebrates an organizational milestone after achieving $1 billion in annual sales by holding our first Billion Dollar Sale for guests. The Billion Dollar Sale thanks all Target guests visiting our 74 stores in 11 states as Target continues to strive to be the best store in town.

1980

1983

Recognition of Community Involvement

President Ronald Reagan awards the Dayton-Hudson Foundation the President's Committee on the Arts & Humanities Medal of Honor for its community giving in arts and social welfare.

1983

Daytons Retire From Board of Directors

Bruce B. Dayton and Kenneth N. Dayton retire from the Dayton-Hudson Corporation Board of Directors, ending 80 years of direct family involvement with the company.

1983

A Target Grand Opening Sale poster reads: Target stores are open now in 8 familiar San Diego locations. Shop our week-long Grand Opening Sale for bargains in every department, including many of your favorite name brands. Extra shopping hours from 9 am to 9 pm Sunday, Feb. 27. No “card” needed to get in, fast one-stop checkouts.”

Target opens its first stores in Southern California.

1985

Santabear Arrives at Dayton's

In 1985, Dayton's guests shopping on the day after Thanksgiving find a new arrival in stores—a cuddly white plush bear named Santabear. Created by senior toy buyer Paul Starkey, the first department store doorbuster of its kind is instantly popular. and within three days of its first appearance in stores, 400,000 bears find a new home. In the years following its smash debut, Santabear's popularity spreads nationwide through television specials and community events. Updated annually with a new outfit and adventure, over the next two decades Santabear becomes a must-have collectible item for the holiday season.

1988

Target opens its first stores in the Pacific Northwest.

1988

Innovation Through Technology

In the mid-1980s, manufacturers begin to test and implement UPC bar-code packaging technology. In 1988, Target becomes the first mass merchandiser to introduce UPC scanning at all Target stores and Distribution Centers. The revolutionary new technology contributes to the evolution of the in-store shopping experience through greater inventory management, increased automation, and most importantly, a shorter wait time at the checklane. The result is a more efficient and enjoyable shopping experience for guests and team members.

1989

A poster features a tuxedoed penguin in front of a Target bullseye logo, with text that reads “Proud as a penguin to sponsor the 1990 International Trans-Antarctica Expedition” Exploration of the Polar Continent

Target becomes the lead sponsor of the International Trans-Antarctica Expedition. Minnesotan Will Steger and Frenchman Jean-Louis Etienne lead a team composed of representatives from six nations to traverse the polar continent. The expedition becomes a world-wide learning tool for environmental and scientific issues of Antarctica as classrooms across the country learn about the unique ecosystem and wildlife of the frozen continent through classroom activities, workshops and televised specials. The journey, completed in 1990, marks the first west-east, unmechanized traverse of Antarctica.

1989

A New Contender in the World of Racing

Now open in 32 states, Target partners with Chip Ganassi to form Target Chip Ganassi Racing. In the years to come, the new racing partnership embodies all the best aspects of what the company represents — speed, excitement, a modern flair, trend setting and success.

1989

Grand Opening in the Southeast

On April 30, Target opens 30 new stores in Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida, becoming a national retailer with stores from coast-to-coast. To share our brand experience of Fast, Fun and Friendly service and quality goods at discounted prices, Target partners with country-music group The Judds to create TV and print advertisements to promote the new stores.

1990

1990

Purchasing a Legendary Retailer

Dayton-Hudson Corporation purchases Marshall Field's, a legendary Chicago-based department store founded in 1852, from Batus Inc., the American arm of B.A.T. Industries P.L.C. The addition increases the corporation's size and scale, positioning Dayton-Hudson as the premier department store company in the Midwestern United States.

1990

Sometimes You Just Need a Bigger Target

On Sept. 30, 1990, Target Greatland is unveiled in Apple Valley, Minn. Fifty percent larger than a standard Target store, Greatland includes many changes that help create a better shopping experience for guests. The new store features amenities such as wider aisles, faster and more efficient checklanes, and automatic teller machines (ATMs). The new store layout also includes more service options, such as Food Avenue, expanded pharmacy and photo services, and electronic information stations with price scanners. The innovative superstore combines superior guest service, great in-store design, and fashionable, affordable merchandise.

1993

Target Expands to Chicago

Target opens 11 stores in the Chicago metropolitan area in one day — the most store openings in any one city on the same day to date.

Map reprinted with permission from Rand McNally.

1994

Evolution of Our Brand Promise

Target Stores unveils its brand promise, Expect More. Pay Less.® to reflect the unique retail experience offered at Target. The brand promise is a natural evolution of Target's commitment to community giving and offering guests value, quality and service, all in a fun and inviting store environment.

1995

Target Offers Credit

The first Target store credit card, known as the Target Guest Card, launches in 1995. It's followed in 2001 by the Target Visa® Credit Card, the first company credit card to be accepted at major retailers nationwide. Renamed REDcards in 2004, the portfolio of credit products expands to add the Target Check Card in 2007.

1995

First SuperTarget® Store Opens

Recognizing that busy shoppers don't always have time to visit several stores in one shopping trip, Target develops the SuperTarget store to provide guests with the convenience of one-stop shopping. The first SuperTarget — which includes a grocery section with fresh produce, dairy, meat — opens in Omaha, Neb., in 1995.

1995

Registry from Coast-to-Coast

Target becomes one of the first mass-market retailers to offer a comprehensive gift-registry service. The introduction of Club Wedd® at Target brought together the latest registration technology, a convenient self-service environment and exclusive merchandise available at low discount prices. Within the first year, more than 125,000 couples register.

1995

A photograph shows a package of Archer Farms Triple Berry Clusters Low-Fat Cereal next to a canister that reads, in part, “Introducing our new reclosable bag-free cereal canister” Archer Farms® Debuts

Target introduces Archer Farms, an exclusive line of premium grocery products. Upon initial launch, Archer Farms includes grocery staples such as bread, milk, pasta and bottled water.

1996

Restoration of a National Treasure

Target joins the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation's effort to restore the Washington Monument by donating $1 million and becoming the five-year lead sponsor. Target even helps to recruit renowned architect and designer Michael Graves to develop unique restoration approaches — including an artful web of steel scaffolding covered with semi-transparent architectural fabric and hundreds of gleaming lights.

1997

Target Welcomes Snowden

Snowden, the plush collectible snowman, makes his first appearance in Target stores just in time for the holiday season. The collectible snowman plush creates a blizzard of excitement after he stars in his first hour-long special with figure skating legends Ekaterina Gordeeva and Scott Hamilton. Over the next several years, guests have the opportunity to take home a new Snowden and a variety of themed merchandise every year.

1997

Recognition for Being a Good Neighbor

Target's Good Neighbor volunteer program, today known as Target Volunteers, receives the President's Service Award from President William J. Clinton. The award is the highest national honor given for corporate volunteer efforts.

1997

An advertisement shows a smiling round-faced child holding an oversized Target credit card and reads, in part, “Shop at Target and earn some extra credit for your school.” Target Supports Education

To help give educators the tools they need to inspire students to embrace learning, Target launches Take Charge of Education®. Through this innovative program, Target donates up to 1 percent of REDcard® purchases at Target or Target.com to eligible K-12 schools. Schools can use the money for anything they choose, such as textbooks and playground equipment. Since 1997, Target has donated more than $320 million to K-12 schools across the country.

1998

Dayton-Hudson Corporation purchases the Associated Merchandising Corporation (AMC).

1999

A New Beauty Genre at Target

In 1997, make-up artist Sonia Kashuk collaborates with supermodel Cindy Crawford on the instructional beauty workbook, Basic Face. During the promotional tour, she is inspired to create a completely new beauty genre — professional makeup at affordable prices.

In 1999, Sonia Kashuk partners with Target to introduce the Sonia Kashuk Professional Makeup Collection, featuring advanced formulas and elegant packaging at an amazing value. Over the years, the product line grows to include fragrance, skin care, nail color and innovative cosmetics accessories while never wavering on the principles of un-compromising style, design, quality and value.

1999

Target Moves Online with Target.com

Target launches Target.com, allowing guests to shop a wide assortment of fashionable, affordable merchandise from the comfort of their own home.

1999

A Target advertisement shows a a Michael Graves teapot with text that reads “a little twist with your tea.” Pioneering Design for All

After working with Target and the National Park Service to design scaffolding for the Washington Monument restoration, world-renowned architect Michael Graves becomes the first of more than 75 designers to create an exclusive line of products for Target.

1999

A Target advertisement shows a white English Bull Terrier with a Target logo painted around one eye standing on a red carpet near a man and woman in fancy evening dress. The headline reads: “Meet Bullseye – The pop culture icon only Madame Tussauds could catch” Bullseye Dog Makes His First Appearance

The original Bullseye, an English Bull Terrier named Arielle, makes his first appearance in a television commercial. Viewers instantly fall in love. In the ensuing years, Bullseye goes on to star in several advertisements and makes numerous celebrity appearances on the red carpet. In 2006, Bullseye becomes the second dog ever to have his likeness displayed in Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum.

1999

First Gift Cards

Target sells its first GiftCards.

1999

A Home Away from Home

In 1997, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital® an organization in Memphis, Tenn., committed to treating all patients regardless of their ability to pay, plans to buy a hotel to solve their long-term housing challenge. With the assistance of generous guests and vendors, Target steps in and funds the construction of Target House®, a home-away-from-home for families with children undergoing treatment for chronic illnesses. Since opening in 1999, more than 1,337 families from 42 states and 36 countries have passed through Target House® and found it to be a place of love, support, community and hope.

2000

2000

Dayton-Hudson Corporation is renamed Target Corporation to better reflect its core business.

2000

The Target Weekly Ad makes its first appearance on Target.com.

2001

Now Open in 47 States

In July, Target Stores passes a major milestone as a national retailer after opening its 1,000th store. Guests have 1,000 reasons to celebrate with a greater selection of style and value in more locations. With stores in every contiguous state except Vermont, Target has a presence from coast to coast.

2001

A photograph shows two shelves of Market Pantry canned goods beneath a store sign that reads “Big Brand Taste. Priced Much, Much Lower.” Market Pantry® Debuts

Target introduces its exclusive private label, Market Pantry.

2002

Popping Up in Unexpected Places

In December, Target introduces one of the first ever Pop-Up stores with Target Boat at Chelsea Pier in New York City. The limited-time, and sometimes mobile, store allowed us to foster a deeper relationship with our Manhattan-area guests by delivering the Target brand in a new, innovative way.

2003

Target introduces the Red Hot Shop on Target.com.

2004

Associated Merchandising Company is renamed Target Sourcing Services.

2004

Target launches its in-store dollar section, See. Spot. Save.®

2004

Eat Well. Pay Less.®

Target continues to be the ultimate one-stop shopping destination by increasing its availability of grocery products at stores in 2003. In 2004, Target introduces the SuperTarget tagline "Eat Well. Pay Less.®" This is our promise to provide a great selection of unique, affordable grocery items as a complement to the hip and fashionable low-priced merchandise for which Target is known.

2004

Target sells retail chains Marshall Field's and Mervyn's.

2004

Summer in the Hamptons

Target turns a local landmark into the Bullseye Inn—the ultimate home and garden store for the chic Hamptons crowd. The historic-home-turned-Pop-Up-store is outfitted in stylish Target merchandise with a special focus on products for summer living and entertaining.

2005

For the first time, Target exceeds $50 billion in annual sales.

2005

An advertisement with a dark wood-grain background reads “Introducing Steakhouse Quality Angus Beef from Sutton & Dodge™” and features the Target bullseye logo next to the words “SuperTarget”

Target launches Sutton and Dodge®, an exclusive premium meat brand.

2005

An advertisement shows a close-up of 9 chocolates on a white background with the headline “Choxie. Fabuless.”

Target launches choxie®, an exclusive premium line of chocolates.

2005

The Future of Pharmacy Is Clear

After her grandmother accidentally ingests her grandfather's medicine, designer Deborah Adler partners with Target to create ClearRxSM, an innovative pharmacy concept that improves the way people take medication. Available at Target Pharmacies, the program features an easy-to-read bottle and color-coded rings, which help minimize the chance of taking the wrong dose or confusing medications between family members.

2005

Target & BLUETM

Target creates Target & BLUE, a way to share technology, security expertise and other resources with law enforcement and criminal justice agencies. In addition to community partnerships such as Safe City, Target creates Law Enforcement Grants to help fund equipment, training and programs to enhance community safety.

2005

A New View on Fashion

Target turns the runway upside down during an electrifying Vertical Fashion Show in New York City. This one-of-a-kind event features world-class athletes/models scaling the walls of a nine-story tower in Rockefeller Center on a 100-foot "vertical catwalk." The event showcases the Target Fall Women's and Men's collections in a surprising and fun way.

2006

SuperTarget® Goes Organic

Target becomes a USDA certified-organic produce retailer, one of the first grocers in the country to do so. To meet these guidelines, the produce is guaranteed to meet USDA organic standards on everything from how it's grown and transported to how it's stocked in our stores. Today, the average SuperTarget carries more than 600 organic items.

2006

Redesigning a Classic

Target redesigns an icon of consumer culture: the shopping cart. Made of recycled plastic, the new shopping cart has a clean, modern look designed to make the shopping experience easier. Continuous handles are added for ergonomic comfort, lightweight plastic makes it easier to handle, and the old wire backrest for kids is replaced by smooth plastic.

2006

An advertisement shows a young woman in a green plaid dress with hands on hips, blowing a kiss at the camera. The headline reads “wear is luella?” Innovation in Design

Target unveils GO International®, an innovative, limited-time-only fashion program designed to provide affordable fashion created by emerging designers. British designer Luella Bartley rolls out the exciting fashion initiative with a traveling boutique in a trademark-red London double-decker bus. The mobile boutique hits the streets of New York for three days only before the new collection launches in all Target stores. Since 2006, more than a dozen world-renowned designers have been featured in the GO International program.

2006

Traveling Target Style

Target welcomes attendees of the 2006 Winter Olympic Games in Italy with special Bullseye-branded trains. Passengers hop aboard for a railway ride from Torino to various event sites, often with a specially branded cowbell or horn to get them into the spirit of the games.

2007

Target Corporation introduces the Target Check Card.®

2007

Celebration of a Giving Milestone

In January, Target celebrates a monumental milestone: giving more than $3 million per week to local communities. Since 1946, the corporation has given 5 percent of its income to our communities to make positive changes in education, arts, social services and volunteerism.

2008

Target's Food Distribution Center

In August, the corporation opens its first Target-owned food distribution center in Lake City, Fla. The new facility is specially designed to distribute perishables such as meat, produce, frozen foods and dairy.

2008

Hello, Alaska!

Target opens its first stores outside the continental U.S. in Anchorage and Wasilla, Alaska. The store design and merchandise assortment cater specifically to the Alaskan market and include sections for fishing supplies and cold-weather gear.

2008

Target School Library Makeover Program

The Target School Library Makeover Program launches through a partnership with The Heart of America Foundation. Through library remodels, donations of more than 1 million books and thousands of volunteer hours, the program has brought new life into school libraries across the United States.

2009

Aloha, Hawaii!

Target opens its first stores in Hawaii on the islands of Oahu and the Big Island. Long before the doors open, Target embraces the Hawaiian culture by taking part in a native Hawaiian ceremony to bless the land in which the new stores will stand. The store environment and merchandise assortment caters specifically to Hawaiian guests and includes specially printed red Hawaiian shirts and surfboards.

2009

Target expands fresh food offerings into stores nationwide.

2010

2010

Liberty of London Crosses the Pond

Just in time for spring, Target launches a new, limited-time partnership with British fashion house Liberty of London, marking the first time a Target collection spans categories ranging from home and garden to fashion for the entire family. Building upon a century's worth of rich heritage and innovation, the partnership allows guests to experience Liberty of London's iconic prints and fashion at affordable prices.

2010

$1 Billion for Education

Target announces its goal to give $1 billion for education by the end of 2015. We're on track to reach that number thanks to innovative education programs and partnerships, including our Target School Library Makeovers, book donations and other reading events around the world.

2011

Expanding the Target Brand Internationally

Target announces its expansion into Canada, extending our stores and shopping experience beyond the United States for the first time in company history by purchasing leasehold interests from Zellers, Inc. 125-135 new Target stores stretching from coast to coast are expected to open in 2013 and 2014. Canadian grocer Sobeys will supply an assortment of frozen, dairy and dry grocery goods, including owned and national brands.

2012

An advertisement shows the number 50 with the zero depicted as a Target bullseye logo. The headline reads “Fast. Fun. Fifty” Celebrating the Big 5-0

Target celebrates 50 years since its first store opened in 1962 and 110 years since the Dayton’s Dry Goods Company—now Target Corporation—was created. To mark this milestone Target hosts a New York City soirée with a guest list that includes noted partners like home-design superstar Nate Berkus, Olympic snowboarder Shaun White and legendary crooner Tony Bennett, as well as Target’s official ambassador, Bullseye.

2012

Smart in the City

The first CityTarget stores open in Los Angeles, Chicago and Seattle. CityTarget stores offer commuters, tourists and urban dwellers the same one-stop shopping convenience of a typical Target store but in a smaller format that’s tailored to an urban neighborhood. Plus, guests will find an assortment that’s the right size for city-dwellers (so no worries about lugging jumbo-packs of paper towels on the bus) and, in typical Target fashion, innovative store features like a digital wall and redesigned navigational signs to help to our multilingual guests find what they need quickly.

2012

Giving Reaches $4 Million a Week

Our community giving gets even bigger with the announcement that Target’s giving has reached $4 million a week to local communities. Since 1946, the corporation has given 5 percent of its profit to our communities to fight hunger, aid disaster preparedness and relief efforts, support the arts and put more kids on the path to graduation.

2012

Making the Most Out of Mobile

Target continues to innovate in mobile and online shopping, allowing our guests to shop wherever, whenever and however they like. Highlights include our Webby Award-winning mobile app, which lets guests navigate a Target store, refill prescriptions, browse the Weekly Ad and more. During the holidays, guests use the app’s QR code scanner to scan top-selling toys’ codes in store, buy the product on their phone and have it shipped for free—even if the toy is sold out. Target also mixes movie-watching and shopping in “Falling for You,” a star-studded short film guests can watch while adding the items from the film to their Target.com cart … without interruption.

2012

Target and Neiman Marcus Partner Up

Target partners with legendary department store Neiman Marcus to create an unprecedented, limited-edition holiday collection. Target + Neiman Marcus features unique items from 24 of America’s preeminent designers, all members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA). In addition to the collection, Target and Neiman Marcus donate $1 million to the CFDA to underscore the retailers' long-standing commitment to fostering design talent.

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